Tuesday, November 05, 2019

Camping at Home

We're now living in our new home. No more housesits. No more weekend escapes. We're in the midst of lots of dust and unconnected stoves.
The builders are making some real progress.
What started out as a utility room with a fuel oil boiler and water heater


has had the floor raised to the same level as the next room. It has new tile, a frame, dry wall, electric outlets for the kitchen and plumbing ready to connect.
Lots of insulation
There's currently a man downstairs mudding the drywall to give it a smooth finish.
He has finished the ceiling and will return tomorrow for the walls. 
Once it's dry, we mist it (half paint/half water) let that dry and paint it.
Then we can put together our kitchen.
This is currently our kitchen.
Our friend Derrick drove his van to Toulouse with us to pick up the kitchen 
The water heater has been moved to the former kitchen 
Safely out of the main traffic areas. 
and we'll put the washing machine underneath it and build a wall around it to make a cupboard.
All the other appliances are in the former kitchen. Even as I type, we're waiting for the dishwasher to be delivered.
I have a stove and can connect the oven with an extension cord. We have a microwave plugged in so can use that.
We've had a tea station since the English builders came so they don't go through withdrawal. But I hadn't been able to make coffee because I have one of those Moka pots that goes on the stovetop.
The friends we housesat for dropped by a press pot so I could make my own coffee this morning.

Coffee, hot water and wait 5 minutes. 
It's nice to not have to buy coffee at the bakery, where I felt the baker's wife was judging me. I had told her in my best mangled French that we had bought a house but didn't have a stove so I had to come buy coffee.
"Well, that's one solution," she replied, also in French and with a tilt of her head. She does not get us Americans.

Dinner is a bit tricky in our camping out house. Last night, I decided we could warm up soup in the microwave.
The French have a soup called velouté, which is vegetables pureed, sometimes with cream fraiche added. It's the same consistency as tomato soup but yummier.
So all I needed was some bread for us to eat with our soup. But the main bakery is closed on Mondays. I wasn't sure what time the auxiliary bakery closed so I decided to head into town to search for bread, figuring the small store or the tabac, which also sells bread, would be bound to have a baguette or something close to a baguette. Both of them were sold out! Everyone in town wanted bread on this rainy night.
We ate the soup sans bread and retired from the plastic covered sofas and the stack of boxes in the living room, 
Kind of a disaster area. Definitely not comfortable for a few more weeks. 
to our bedroom. That means walking up the stairs, past the bare bulb that hangs there to our bedroom, which has a headboard, a bed and one side table. The room hasn't been painted or "decorated" as the Brits say. I started on one wall and decided the color was too dark. 
The dark green was the color I tried, but it looked much lighter in the patch I tested.
For now, we're living with the mint green. 
Now I have to make a new choice. I find myself surprisingly dispassionate about what color the rooms will be painted. 
Tonight we're springing for a pizza and salad. Tomorrow night friends have invited us over. So we'll get through this camping period, and no one should worry that we aren't eating enough!
Now back to grading and teaching -- any excuse to avoid working on the house. 

5 comments:

Latane Barton said...

Mercy! What a project! but it will be wonderful once done.

Kiwi said...

If you'd like to try another green for the bedroom, Farrow & Ball (available in France) has a grey green called "French Gray No.18" that is very sophisticated and neutral. Hope your renovations proceed apace and you will soon be able to enjoy your new appliances and refreshed spaces.

Pallavi Goyal said...

High net worth individuals who are looking to open their business or invest in a running business in France can now take advantage of the France Investor Immigration Program which provides a 10-year residency permit for the investor.

Unknown said...

ganga bhakti

Just Me said...

Loved this post Paulita. Enjoyed and savored every word, phrase, funny and picture. Signed, Not taking your writing for granted.

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